The Raytown High School Counseling Program

  • Building Vision and Mission

    DREAM to reach great heights.

    ACHIEVE in academics and activities.

    SUCCEED in life.

     

    Department Vision and Mission

    VISION

    The vision of the Raytown High School Counseling Program is for students to depart the school with the tools needed to enter the next phase of their lives as responsible, respectful, and well-rounded individuals within a pluralistic society. 

     

    MISSION

    The mission of the Raytown High School Counseling Program is to promote achievement and personal growth by decreasing or eliminating barriers to success in the areas of academic, personal/social, and career/college through student advocacy, school leadership, and effective interventions that are equitable and accessible to all students. 

     

    Department Belief Statements

    Counselors at Raytown High School believe that…

    • All students can learn and deserve to learn.

    • Students learn best when their basic physical and emotional needs are met, and when they are in an environment that feels safe.

    • All students deserve to work with adults who value and honor their individual experiences.

    • Counselors are an integral part in the establishment of a school culture that promotes diversity, equity, and inclusion.

    • Relationships are paramount to the academic success of students.

    • A positive, collaborative relationship between home and school is essential to student success.

    • Students must be given the opportunity to identify their strengths and explore post-secondary educational and/or career paths that align with their skills and interests.

    • The counseling program promotes the development of skilled, independent, healthy,life-long learners.

    • An effective counseling program is developmental, sequential, and comprehensive, and responds to individual and group needs.

    • Students who are able to utilize critical thinking skills in all situations are able to make healthy decisions and become productive citizens within the school and the global community.

     

    Department Goals

    • Behavior: RHS counselors will work to increase positive relationships in students by promoting emotion regulation, communication skills, and conflict management. These skills will be addressed individually, in small groups, and in classroom lessons. Progress will be measured by teacher and administrator survey responses at 85% reporting improvement at the culmination of programming for the 2022-2023 school year, as well as a review of discipline data from the 2022-2023 school year.

    • Attendance: RHS counselors will work to increase attendance  by implementing a range of interventions in collaboration with the school social worker. Interventions will include parent support, addressing school climate, culture, and morale, and individual student planning for students who have lower than 80% attendance. Progress will be measured by overall student attendance data at the culmination of programming for the 2022-2023 school year.

    • Academics: RHS counselors will provide meaningful academic planning and advisement to students using the ICAP as a baseline tool and assessment. Counselors will present classroom advisement lessons to help students make informed academic planning decisions. Counselors will also have individual conversations with students. Progress will be measured by student completion of the ICAP at the culmination of the 2022-2023 school year with the goal being 100% completion.

     

    The Role of the School Counselor

    A fully implemented comprehensive school counseling program has been proven to provide far-reaching benefits to all students. These benefits include increased academic achievement, attendance, confidence, socioemotional relationships, and an overall increased positive school experience. Implementing an equity-centered, trauma-informed comprehensive school counseling program that is part of a school-wide system of care will allow for students to have access to support for any barriers to success. This will reduce the number of personal/social/behavioral issues in class, so that teachers can focus on teaching and students can focus on learning.

     

    The counselor provides both direct and indirect services to students in order to help them succeed. Direct services are interactions between school counselors and students. Indirect student services are interactions with others, on behalf of the student, including referrals for additional assistance, consultation and collaboration with parents, teachers, other educators and community organizations. It also includes management activities and services required to support the comprehensive school counseling program, as well as the other educational programs of the district. 

     

    The program components are as follows: 

    • School Counselor Curriculum: lessons presented to help students attain the desired GLEs in the areas of social/emotional, academic and career development. The school counseling curriculum is systematically presented by the school counselor in collaboration with teachers and administration. 

    • Individual Student Planning: ongoing systematic activities designed to assist students in establishing personal goals, transitioning through school and developing future plans. 

    • Responsive Services: activities designed to meet the immediate needs and concerns of students. Responsive services may include counseling in individual settings, small-group settings or crisis response. 

    • System Support: includes the management and evaluation activities and services required to effectively support the comprehensive school counseling program.

     

    In order to track progress, the program will be evaluated using the following metrics: 

    • Student planning survey at beginning of year 

    • Teacher planning survey at beginning of year 

    • Student surveys after small groups and classroom units 

     

    Data will be collected to gather the following information: 

    • Number of classroom lessons presented and students participating  

    • Number of small group sessions held and students participating 

    • Number of individual counseling sessions held, broken down into categories:  

      • Crisis response 

      • Academic 

      • Social 

      • Other 

    Data will be reviewed and shared with the administrative team quarterly.

     

    Benefits of a Comprehensive School Counseling Program

    Adapted from the Missouri Comprehensive School Counseling Program Manual (2017)

     

    Benefits for Students

    • Focuses on all students

    • Enhances students’ academic performance

    • Centers on students’ needs

    • Seeks students’ input

    • Encourages more interaction among students

    • Provides a developmental and preventative focus

    • Promotes knowledge and assistance in career exploration and development

    • Enhances life coping skills

    • Helps students feel connected to school

    • Enhances students’ social/emotional development

    • Develops decision‐making skills

    • Increases knowledge of self and others

    • Broadens knowledge of our changing work world

    • Increases opportunities for school counselor‐student interaction

    • Develops a system of long‐range planning for students

     

    Benefits for Parents/Guardians

    • Enhances students’ academic performance, and their social/emotional and career development

    • Encourages outreach to all parents/guardians

    • Provides support for parents/guardians regarding each child’s educational development

    • Increases opportunities for school counselor interaction

    • Encourages input of parents/guardians

    • Provides parents/guardians information about available resources

    • Assures parents/guardians that all children will receive support from the school counseling program

     

    Benefits for Teachers

    • Contributes to a team effort to enhance students’ social/emotional, academic, and career development

    • Provides relevant curriculum ideas using school counseling grade level expectations

    • Establishes the school counselor as a resource/consultant

    • Encourages teachers’ input into the delivery of the comprehensive school counseling program

    • Encourages positive, collaborative working relationships

    • Defines the role of school counselors as educators

     

    Benefits for the Board of Education

    • Enhances students’ social/emotional, academic, and career development

    • Encourages greater school‐community interaction

    • Meets the school counseling standards found in the Missouri School Improvement Program

    • Provides a rationale for including a comprehensive school counseling program in a school system

    • Provides program information to district patrons

    • Provides a basis for determining funding allocations for the program

    • Provides ongoing evaluation data concerning the full implementation of the program, the work of school counselors within the program, and the attainment of relevant school counseling student outcomes



    Benefits for Administrators

    • Enhances students’ social/emotional, academic, and career development

    • Provides a clearly defined organizational structure for the comprehensive school counseling program

    • Establishes a clearly defined job description for school counselors

    • Provides a way to supervise and evaluate school counselors

    • Encourages administrative input and involvement in the implementation and evaluation of the comprehensive school counseling program

    • Provides the way to meet Missouri School Improvement Program standards for school counseling

    • Provides a means of accountability through comprehensive school counseling program, personnel, and results evaluations

    • Enhances the image of the comprehensive school counseling program in the school and community

    • Promotes the work of school counselors as providers of direct services to students and parents, as well as being a consultant and collaborator with teachers and administrators

     

    Benefits for the Community

    • Encourages input from business, industry, labor, and other community partners including community mental health and social service agencies

    • Increases opportunities for collaboration among school counselors and business, industry, labor, and other community partners including community mental health and social service agencies

    • Enhances the role of the school counselor as a resource person

    • Facilitates the development of students as active responsible citizens

    • Increases opportunities for business, industry, labor, and other community partners including community mental health and social service agencies to actively participate in the total school program

    • Enhances students’ academic performance as well as their social/emotional and career development

    • Supplies a future workforce that has decision‐making skills, pre‐employment skills, and increased worker maturity

     

    Counselor Accessibility and Referral Process 

    Counselors are available to assist all students at any point a need arises. Anyone can refer a student to receive help from the counselor (parents, teachers, administrators, student self-referral). Students, parents, and teachers should familiarize themselves with the counselor assignments so that the correct counselor is notified when a student is referred. The counselor assignments are as follows:

     

    Dr. Northcutt: Students with a targeted graduation date of 2023

    Ms. Cross: Students with a targeted graduation date of 2024

    Dr. Love: Students with a targeted graduation date of 2025

    Ms. Bobbitt: Students with a targeted graduation date of 2026   

     

    Based on the student needs, the counselor may make a referral to the school social worker, the school therapist, or to outside agencies as appropriate. 

     

    For most needs, students should request an appointment via the link provided. Counselors will call students out of class when available. This helps to eliminate excessive traffic in the counseling office as well as minimize time spent out of class.